Here"s an interesting and wonderful heartfelt story about a working woman who took surprising and effective initiative caring for her ailing mother.

The Globe and Mail article here spells out almost to a tee how the responsibilities of adding caregiving into an already full career and lifestyle could have taken a major toll on this working woman’s health and mind.  But she used her common sense and business skill and created a system that worked brilliantly for her.

After you’ve read about her story, come back here and use the following guide to begin your own process to cope with added responsibility.

Here now is the article – remember, come back to get your template below.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/careers/management/morning-manager/sandwiched-between-a-busy-career-and-an-aging-parent/article2300104/page1/

Caregivers are Experts!

You may be working and raising a family at the same time. And your parents, or your spouse, or even a child suddenly needs your help in a way that takes up a larger portion of time – unexpectedly.  What do you do?

Well, a lot of people get angry, sad, panic, and become over-stressed to the point of getting sick themselves.  I don’t want that for you!

Do read the story above. 

Because once you become familiar with the person you are caring for, you become the expert.  And it’s you that people turn to for answers – the medical industry, the rest of your family, and even the scared, loved one him/herself relies on you to know EVERYTHING!

So how can you create the business of caring and keep your sanity?

As you read in the globe and Mail article, the woman used a business skill and strategy.

You don’t have to go to the Ivey School of Business of caregiving, so here then is a simple first step for you:

You know a lot more about your loved one than you might think. Use this template as a starting point.  You will be so surprised at what you know, what you need, and what steps to take next!

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Print this page and use it as a guideline.

We’ll look at more options in the next blog post.

Until then, great job!

 

  Medical Information

  Primary Illness/Condition

 

  Other Conditions (please list)

 

  Medications / Therapies

  (please list)

 

  Activities and Habits

  Favorite Foods (please list)

 

  Favorite Drinks

 

  Favorite Activities

 

  Favorite Things (Possessions)

 

  Favorite Pieces of Clothing

 

 Favorite People

 

 Food allergies (please list)

 

 Usual Wake-up / Bed Time

 Wake-up:

 Bedtime:

 Naps (Circle best answer)

 Never         Sometimes          Daily        

  More than 1/day   




 

 

 Personal History

 Places lived (please list)

 

 

 Favorite Hobbies / Shows

 

 

 Most recent job/occupation

 

 

 Religious/Spiritual Beliefs

 

 

 Levels of Assistance for Daily Activities

 

 Needs Help? (yes/no)

 If yes, how often?

(Circle one)

 Bathing

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Toileting

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Eating

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Bed Mobility

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Walking/Locomotion

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Wheelchair use

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Dressing

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Grooming

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Exercises

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Laundry

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Incontinence

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Housecleaning

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Safety (preventing injuries)

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Transportation

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Levels of Assistance for Daily Activities

 Cognitive Abilities

 Needs help? (yes/no)

 If yes, how often?

 Medications

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Daily Financial Assistance

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Repetitive Questioning

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Remembers Appointments

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Short Term Memory Loss

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Cognitive Abilities Continued

 Needs Help? (yes/no)

 If yes, how often?    (Circle one)

 Socialization

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Requires Supervision

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Inappropriate Behaviors

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 Help with Decision Making

 

 Sometimes     Often     Always

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Other Observances

 Needs Help? (yes/no)

 If yes, how often?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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